Marshawn Lynch sits for US anthem, stands for Mexican anthem

Oakland Raider Marshawn Lynch again protested the U.S. national anthem Sunday at a game against the New England Patriots in Mexico by sitting during The Star-Spangled Banner, but standing during the Mexican national anthem.
Oakland Raider Marshawn Lynch protested the U.S. national anthem Sunday at a game in Mexico City by sitting during The Star-Spangled Banner and standing during the Mexican national anthem.

Oakland Raider Marshawn Lynch protested the U.S. national anthem Sunday at a game in Mexico City by sitting during The Star-Spangled Banner and standing during the Mexican national anthem. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Oakland Raider Marshawn Lynch again protested during the U.S. national anthem Sunday at a game against the New England Patriots in Mexico by sitting during The Star-Spangled Banner, but standing during the Mexican national anthem.

Marshawn Lynch sits during the US national anthem, stands for Mexican anyhem pic.twitter.com/8wdaKprEki

— Ben Volin (@BenVolin) November 19, 2017

While there did not appear to be any other anthem protests ahead of the game in Mexico City, the Raiders running back sat down for a majority of the U.S. anthem.

Lynch has not stood for The Star-Spangled banner since he came out of retirement this season to join the Raiders.

Other NFL members playing in America, however, protested ahead of their games.

Most players, who protest during the anthem to address social justice issues, put a pause on kneeling during the anthem last weekend in honor of Veterans Day.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Florida struggles from the floor, holds off New Hamphire to stay unbeaten

The Gators (3-0) had been averaging a nation-leading 112 points per game in their first two wins. But they shot just 32 percent Sunday.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Jalen Hudson scored 26 points, including a dunk midway through the second half that put No. 8 Florida ahead for good during a 70-63 victory over plucky New Hampshire on Sunday night.

The Gators (3-0) had been averaging a nation-leading 112 points per game in their first two wins. But they shot just 32 percent, and New Hampshire (1-2) took advantage.

A desperation 3-pointer at the halftime buzzer lifted the Wildcats into a 32-32 tie, and they continued their upset bid after the break.

A fall-back 3 by John Ogwuche gave New Hampshire the lead with under 10 minutes left. Hudson came back with a dunk, and later scored nine straight points to keep Florida in front.

Tanner Leissner finished with 23 points for the Wildcats.

Transfer Egor Koulechov shot just 4 for 14 for Florida, but had 14 points and 10 rebounds.

The Gators extended their all-time record against the Wildcats to 4-0.

BIG PICTURE

New Hampshire: The Wildcats have lost their last two games, but the losses came against traditional powers Florida and Texas. The Wildcats have some less well-known competition coming up, which should provide the opportunity reboot before America East competition begins in January.

Florida: The Gators continue to raise expectations with each win. They’ll face higher caliber competition at the Phil Knight Invitational in Portland, Oregon.

BACK IN BUSINESS

After starting Thursday’s win over North Florida on the bench for missing an academic deadline, Gators center Kevarrius Hayes was back in the starting lineup. He finished with six points and six rebounds.

UP NEXT

New Hampshire heads home to play winless American University on Tuesday. The Wildcats will then head to Nashville for a pair of neutral-site games against Furman and Utah State.

The Gators will play Stanford across the country on Thanksgiving in the first round of the Phil Knight Invitational. They’ll then play either Ohio State or Gonzaga on Friday and one more tournament game on Sunday before returning home and taking a week off.

Saints’ comeback earns them 8th win in a row

The Saints needed overtime to overcome the Washington Redskins.

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Alvin Kamara climbed into the Superdome stands, stood in the first row with his arms folded and soaked in the adulation of fans who were relishing their decision to stick around after all had looked lost.

Kamara’s celebration of his 18-yard touchdown reception had an air of presumption, given New Orleans still needed a 2-point conversion to erase what had been a 15-point deficit when the Washington Redskins scored with 5:58 left in regulation. Then again, the Saints’ confidence was understandable; they haven’t lost in more than two months.

Kamara climbed back down in time to take a pitch into the end zone for the needed conversion, and the Saints won their eighth straight when Wil Lutz’s 28-yard field goal capped a 34-31 triumph in overtime.

“We just kind of hung in there. Guys believed,” said Saints coach Sean Payton, whose mind seemed to be racing as he labored to recall details of the frenzied final stretch. “There were a lot of things happening in a short period of time.”

Drew Brees passed for 385 yards and two touchdowns, going 11 of 11 for 164 yards and his only two touchdowns on New Orleans’ final two possessions of regulation. His first TD went to tight end Josh Hill from 3 yards out with 2:53 to go and the last to Kamara with 1:05 left.

“I tip my hat to Brees. That’s what he does. That’s what great quarterbacks do. But at the end of the day, we’ve got to make plays,” said Redskins safety D.J. Swearinger, whose first-quarter interception was Brees’ first turnover in four games. “We didn’t do our job. We beat ourselves for sure.”

The unlikely comeback made New Orleans the first team since the 1970 AFL-NFL merger to win eight straight after starting 0-2.

“We haven’t encountered a game like this in a while, and it was great to watch the team rally,” said Brees, whose team won its previous seven games more convincingly. “We have the confidence to win in a lot of different ways. We have the personnel to do it and the right attitude to do it.”

The Saints (8-2) set up their final drive by stopping Samaje Perine on third-and-1 at the two-minute warning when a first down would have allowed Washington (4-6) to run out the clock.

Washington moved into winning field-goal range in the final minute of regulation, only to be pushed back by a fluky grounding penalty that appeared to result from Kirk Cousins’ miscommunication receiver Jamison Crowder, followed by a sack.

The Redskins received the ball first in overtime, but the Saints’ hobbled defense, which gave up more yards than in any game during its winning streak, forced a quick punt thanks in part to Cameron Jordan’s sack.

“We had a surplus of emotion and a surplus of confidence,” Jordan said. “That was the difference-maker.”

Mark Ingram capped a 134-yard rushing performance with gains of 20 and 31 yards on back-to-back carries to set up Lutz’s clinching kick.

Cousins passed for 322 yards and three touchdowns, finishing 22 of 32 with no interceptions. His touchdowns went for 40 yards to Ryan Grant, 16 to Chris Thompson and 7 to Jeremy Sprinkle. Grant’s TD, which made it 24-13 in the third quarter, capped a drive extended by a successful fake punt on fourth-and-1 from the Redskins 15-yard line.

Perine carried 23 times for 117 yards, including his 1-yard TD.

HOBBLED DEFENSE

New Orleans entered the game without veteran safety Kenny Vaccaro and then lost top cornerback Marshon Lattimore on Washington’s first possession when he twisted his left ankle diving to break up a pass in the end zone. Leading tackler A.J. Klein (ankle) also missed his first game.

The Redskins gained 456 yards — their second most this season — against a defense that hadn’t allowed more than 347 yards in any game during New Orleans’ winning streak.

QUESTIONED CALL

Cousins said he understood why the pivotal grounding penalty was called when he threw to an empty spot where Crowder had vacated, but he disagreed with officials’ interpretation.

“If he had turned and looked at me and the ball had been 10 feet over his head, I can just say the ball slipped out of my hand,” Cousins said. “That’s what I didn’t understand — how do you separate an inaccurate throw from no eligible in the area? I felt like an eligible was in the area, so I threw it in the area.”

INJURIES

Redskins: Running back Chris Thompson was carted off the field with what the Redskins said was a broken right fibula in the third quarter.

“Chris was one of our best players if not our best player this year,” Cousins said. “It’s going to be challenging to continue to move the ball with all the guys we’ve had injured, but we’ll find a way.”

Guard Shawn Lauvao left in the first half with what team officials described as a stinger. Reserve defensive end Terrell McClain left in the first half with an injured toe.

Saints: Lattimore tried to return for the first defensive series of the second half, but lasted one play. Defensive end Alex Okafor left in the fourth quarter, favoring his left leg.

UP NEXT

Redskins: Host the New York Giants on Thanksgiving night.

Saints: Travel to Los Angeles to play the Rams.

Chargers defense comes up huge in 52-24 win over Bills

Rivers passed for 250 yards and Keenan Allen had 12 receptions for 159 yards and two touchdowns for the Chargers

CARSON, Calif. (AP) — Casey Hayward made two of the Chargers’ five interceptions during a horrific first half by Buffalo rookie quarterback Nathan Peterman, and Los Angeles cruised to a 54-24 victory over the slumping Bills on Sunday.

Korey Toomer returned Peterman’s first interception 59 yards for a touchdown on Buffalo’s opening drive, the rookie threw two more interceptions in the first quarter and two additional picks in the second. Peterman was pulled from his first NFL start with a 37-7 halftime deficit after just 14 pass attempts for the Bills (5-5), who lost their third straight.

Buffalo benched Tyrod Taylor and promoted the fifth-round pick from Pitt earlier this week despite being in playoff position. Coach Sean McDermott replaced Peterman with Taylor in the second half, and the veteran went 15 of 25 for 158 yards, throwing one TD pass and rushing for another score.

The Chargers thoroughly capitalized on Peterman’s mistakes, putting up a 27-point second quarter and their highest-scoring performance in Philip Rivers’ 195 consecutive starts since 2006. Los Angeles set a franchise record for points in a first half during the Bills’ worst defensive half since 1977, and the Chargers posted a resounding win for coach Anthony Lynn, who finished last season as Bills interim coach.

Rivers passed for 250 yards and Keenan Allen had 12 receptions for 159 yards and two touchdowns for the Chargers (4-6), whose offense capitalized on the extraordinary bounty created by its defense.

Joey Bosa particularly harassed Peterman, with his pressure contributing to Peterman’s second and third picks. Bosa also forced a fumble while sacking Taylor on fourth down in the third quarter, and Melvin Ingram returned it 39 yards for a touchdown.

Taylor hit LeSean McCoy with a 12-yard TD pass on fourth down in the fourth quarter. McCoy also rushed for 114 yards and an early score.

One week after a heartbreaking overtime loss in Jacksonville, the Chargers snapped a two-game skid and got back into fine form on both sides of the ball. Melvin Gordon and Austin Ekeler rushed for TDs, and Nick Novak kicked four field goals.

Peterman actually completed his first two passes, and his first interception wasn’t his fault. The pass hit fullback Pat DiMarco in the hands and went airborne, allowing Toomer to catch it for a rollicking return down the Buffalo sideline.

The Bills even tied it in the first quarter when McCoy made two runs totaling 64 yards, including a 27-yard scoring run for the Bills’ first touchdown in a first quarter this season.

But Peterman threw his third interception to Tre Boston while getting planted on his back by Bosa, and Allen then caught his first touchdown pass since the Chargers’ opener on a beautiful back-shoulder throw by Rivers.

Los Angeles took a 47-10 lead in the third quarter and got many of its regulars off the field in the second half to rest for its Thanksgiving game at Dallas.

INJURIES

Bills: Buffalo played without starting LT Cordy Glenn and WR Jordan Matthews, who sat out with a knee injury. … The Bills lost new WR Kelvin Benjamin to a right knee injury after a 20-yard catch on their opening drive. … S Micah Hyde injured his knee early in the second half.

Chargers: LT Russell Okung left the field gingerly in the second quarter, but missed only two snaps. … WR Travis Benjamin was sidelined by a strained abdominal muscle.

RIVERS RECOVERS

Rivers spent the week in the NFL’s concussion protocol after reporting symptoms on Monday , but he was cleared in time to keep alive his streak of consecutive starts since the 2006 opener. The veteran went 21 of 33 before Kellen Clemens played the fourth quarter.

BIG KICKS

Bills kicker Stephen Hauschka set an NFL record by making his 13th consecutive field goal of 50 yards or longer during the third quarter. He also tied the franchise record with his sixth 50-yard field goal of the season.

UP NEXT

Bills: At Kansas City Chiefs on Sunday.

Chargers: At Dallas Cowboys on Thursday.

— —

For more NFL coverage: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP — NFL

Rams machine needs some repairs after 24-7 loss at Minnesota

The Rams’ four-game winning streak was tossed aside by a determined Vikings defense in a 24-7 defeat on Sunday in this matchup of NFC division leaders.

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Los Angeles Rams arrived in Minnesota with the NFL’s highest-scoring offense, a machine averaging 33 points per game and making the team the talk of the league with this sharp turnaround under new coach Sean McVay.

Their four-game winning streak was tossed aside by a determined Vikings defense in a 24-7 defeat on Sunday in this matchup of NFC division leaders.

After a 75-yard touchdown drive to start the game, the only tangible production by the Rams was extra punting practice for Johnny Hekker. The Rams totaled just 254 yards, with 54 yards coming from on a garbage-time possession at the end of the game against mostly Vikings backups.

“We can play a lot better than we performed,” said Jared Goff, who had guided the Rams to a 144-41 scoring advantage during the streak with 1,025 passing yards and nine touchdowns with only one interception.

The Vikings started the second half by forcing four punts in a row by the Rams (7-3), who also led the league entering the week with a third-down conversion rate of 46.7 percent. They moved the chains just three times in 11 opportunities against the Vikings.

“They had some good tight coverage. They had some disguises, some different things that disrupted our timing and our rhythm,” said McVay, who declared his team “humbled” by the Vikings throughout the course of the afternoon at daunting U.S. Bank Stadium.

With the crowd noise reverberating off the translucent roof to give the defense, which ranked fifth in the NFL in both points and yards allowed, an even greater advantage, Goff often had to walk back and forth to tell his wide receivers the plays before the snap to keep McVay’s fast-paced, no-huddle scheme going.

Goff finished 23 for 37 for 225 yards and no turnovers, taking only one sack.

He didn’t force any dangerous throws or take any huge hits, but the unpredictable pressure the Vikings sent at him from all position levels added up over time and clearly took the second-year quarterback out of his element. Hekker was forced to punt six times, the second-highest total of the season.

“It’ll be good to see what this adversity will do for our team,” Goff said. “We responded to every bit of adversity we faced so far and expect no different.”

The defense was stout in the first half, forcing punts by the Vikings on two of four possessions, and the Rams were in position to take a one-touchdown lead late in the second quarter. Rookie wide receiver Cooper Kupp caught a pass over the middle on third-and-4 from the 11-yard line and reached the 1, before Vikings safety Anthony Harris stripped the ball out and recovered the fumble with 4:03 left before halftime.

“That’s seven points coming off the board there. You never know what happens if they go up 14-7,” Vikings safety Harrison Smith said.

What has made the Vikings defense so difficult to play against this season, as the Rams found out, is the improvement in stopping the run.

Rushing the passer and solid coverage in the secondary have long been hallmarks of coach Mike Zimmer’s scheme, but the Vikings have been just as tough this year when the ball stays on the ground. After Todd Gurley capped the opening possession with a short touchdown run, the NFL’s fifth-leading rusher had only 17 yards on 11 carries the rest of the game.

“If you want to play after the regular season, if you want to play late in the year in big games,” Rams left tackle Andrew Whitworth said, “this is the atmosphere you’re going to have to learn how to play and win in.”

M.J. Walker, Terance Mann lead FSU past Colorado State in Jamaica Classic

Mfiondu Kabengele added 12 points and CJ Walker had 11 for the Seminoles (3-0), who used an 11-0 run for a 76-60 lead with 6:28 to play.

MONTEGO BAY, Jamaica (AP) — M.J. Walker came off the bench to hit five 3-pointers and score a career-high 22 points, Terance Mann added 20 and Florida State pulled away from Colorado State 90-73 at the Jamaica Classic on Sunday night.

Mfiondu Kabengele added 12 points and CJ Walker had 11 for the Seminoles (3-0), who used an 11-0 run for a 76-60 lead with 6:28 to play.

The Rams (2-2), who scored the first 11 points of the second half to wipe out an 11-point halftime deficit, got 22 points from Prentiss Nixon, 16 in the second half, and 14 points and 10 rebounds from Che Bob. Lorenzo Jenkins scored 14 points off the bench, hitting 4 of 5 3’s, including one that put CSU on top 50-48.

Walker had a career high by halftime with 14 points and Mann added 12 as the Seminoles shot 62 percent to lead 47-36 at halftime.

BIG PICTURE

Colorado State: The Rams are 4-9 against ACC teams with all of the wins coming at neutral sites. … CSU outrebounded Florida State 37-34 but had 22 turnovers to just 14 for the Seminoles. Those miscues cost the Rams 23.

Florida State: In beating Fordham 67-43 in their first game in Jamaica, the Seminoles had their fifth-best field-goal percent defense (.231) in school history, giving up just 12 made baskets. … FSU, which led the nation with 183 dunks in 2016-17, is looking to win the nation’s dunk crown again with 17 in the first three games. The Seminoles averaged 5.2 a game last year.

DOING BETTER

Colorado State shot 45 percent in the first half, 42 in the second. It wasn’t great but certainly better than in its 80-53 loss to Tulane two nights earlier. The Rams shot 35.5 percent for the game, 22 percent in the second half. Considering what Florida State did to Fordham, that is a marked improvement.

JUST SAYING HI

PJ Savoy of Florida State left the game early in the first half after talking an elbow to the face and did not start the second half. Robbie Berwick delivered the unintentional blow. Berwick played his first two seasons at Florida State. Savoy did contribute a basket in the 11-0 run that helped the Seminoles take control and scored seven points in eight minutes. Berwick missed all four of his shots and did not score in 12 minutes.

UP NEXT

Colorado State: The Rams stop at New Mexico State on their way home for a game on Wednesday.

Florida State: Home against Kennesaw State on Wednesday.

Holder’s 35 leads high-scoring Sun Devils to another blowout win

ASU scored 90 or more points in a game for the 4th time this season, and 50-plus by halftime for the 3rd time.

TEMPE, Ariz. — Arizona State coach Bobby Hurley made sure to touch hands with his point guard, Tra Holder, at the end of Sunday’s game. In case, Hurley said he felt like taking a few shots in the gym himself.

Holder had the afternoon’s hot hand, scoring 19 of his career high 35 points in another big first half for Arizona State. The Sun Devils rolled to a 99-78 win over California-Irvine.

Holder, a senior, made 13 of his 15 shots for the game and missed just once in each half.

“It kind of felt good every time I shot. Even one of 3s I missed in the first half, I thought it was going in as well,” Holder said. “I knew one day I would have a game where I couldn’t miss but that was a good feeling.”

Arizona State (4-0) scored 90 or more points in a game for the fourth time this season, and 50-plus by halftime for the third time. The Sun Devils shot 69 percent as a team in the first half with Holder making 7 of 8, including 4 of 5 on 3-pointers.

“It was one of the better performances that I’ve seen from a player I’ve coached,” Hurley said. “He looks very relaxed when he’s shooting the deep ones. It’s something he’s worked on.”

Guard Shannon Evans added 22 points and seven assists, knocking down all four of his first-half 3s. ASU made 10 of 13 in the first half and 14 of 23 for the game.

Arizona State’s 90 points in four straight games happened for the first time since Feb. 28-March 15, 1975.

“Coach gives us a lot of freedom, a lot of trust,” Holder said. “It’s great to know that you’ve got somebody who won’t take you out if you make a mistake or miss a shot. He’s with you to the end.”

Romello White added 14 points and 11 rebounds, his second double-double of the season.

Tommy Rutherford, Max Hazzard and Evan Leonard led UC-Irvine with 15 points each. The Anteaters (2-3) committed 10 first-half turnovers and 19 for the game.

The Sun Devils used a 12-0 run to take a 22-6 lead, then went ahead 37-20 on Remy Martin’s 3-pointer with 7:28 to play in the half.

UC-Irvine cut the lead to 43-32 on a 3 from Leonard at the 4:01 mark, but the Sun Devils extended their lead before the half.

Arizona State led by as many as 21 in the second half, but UC-Irvine battled back to make it a 76-65 game on a pair of Eyassu Worku free throws with 8:01 to play.

That was as close as the Anteaters were able to get. Kodi Justice hit a 3 with 3:59 to play to give the Sun Devils a 90-73 lead, and Justice finished with 18 points.

“We didn’t do a very good job individually or as a team on those three guys (Holder, Evans, Justice),” UCI coach Russell Turner said. “Which is disappointing because that was the focus of our game plan. You have to give those guys credit, they played at a high level.”

BIG PICTURE

Arizona State is 4-0 for the first time since 2013-14. That season’s team started out 6-0 and went on to the NCAA tournament. But the first big test for ASU is on Thanksgiving in Las Vegas, when the Sun Devils face Kansas State, which will likely be 4-0 as well after its game on Monday. The Wildcats have blown out their first three opponents.

Hurley said improvements in rebounding and free throw shooting need to be made against Kansas State, and ASU will have rotation depth with forward Mickey Mitchell, a transfer from Ohio State, available this week.

SCOREBOARD OUTAGE

The overhead and end zone scoreboards went dark with 11:19 left in the game but came back on at the 7:48 mark.

During the outage the only visible game clocks were above each basket. A manual score counter on the scorers’ table was also used, and the public address announcer informed the crowd of the score.

TECH TIME

Anteaters forward John Edgar Jr. was issued a technical foul for what appeared to be some chirping after he made a 3-pointer and was coming back up the court on defense.

HIGHLIGHT REEL

Holder capped off his big first half with a deep 3 two seconds before the halftime buzzer, then squatted down and struck a pose. It gave Arizona State its largest lead of the game up to that point.

UP NEXT

Arizona State hosts Kansas State on Thanksgiving Day in Las Vegas.

‘The Walking Dead’ Season 8, Episode 5 recap: The Saviors crack under the pressure

The longest day in the history of the zombie apocalypse continues to amble on in Season 8 of “The Walking Dead.” This week, fans got a glimpse of the dissension in the ranks caused to the Saviors from Rick’s attack in “The Big Scary U.”
Steven Ogg as Simon - The Walking Dead _ Season 8, Episode 5 - Photo Credit: Gene Page/AMC

Steven Ogg as Simon – The Walking Dead _ Season 8, Episode 5 – Photo Credit: Gene Page/AMC (© 2017 AMC Film Holdings LLC. All Rights Reserved.)

The longest day in the history of the zombie apocalypse continues to amble on in Season 8 of “The Walking Dead.” This week, fans got a glimpse of the dissension in the ranks caused to the Saviors from Rick’s attack in “The Big Scary U.”

The episode opens with what appears to be some ominous foreshadowing in which Father Gabriel prays for redemption reached redemption. He makes it clear that he no longer fears death, but dying without a purpose. Meanwhile, prior to Rick’s attack, the incredibly scary Simon is convincing Gregory that he believes he’s on the side of the Saviors. Sadly, the audience knows just how badly Gregory lets Simon down, leading to his cowardly romp back to The Hilltop. He’s in the middle of trying to convince Negan himself, when Rick arrives.

From there, it catches up to the present where Negan and Father Gabriel are surrounded by walkers together in a trailer while the Saviors try to figure out how to get out of their incredibly precarious situation without their fearless leader. Gabriel suggests that he may have found his purpose, to get Negan’s last confession.

Inside the Sanctuary, Simon is trying to figure out what to do when Regina suggests sacrificing about 40 workers so that a few soldiers can go to check on the outposts and get supplies to bail out the compound. Eugene sheepishly tells her the plan is flawed and that not only is there an inadequate chance of success, but it might turn the workers on the soldiers. The others get upset, but Dwight sticks up for Eugene. Additionally, it doesn’t take long for one of them to figure out that Rick attacking while all the outpost heads were in one place means a Savior has gone rogue.

Realizing that he is the most likely suspect to be a turncoat, Eugene privately thanks Dwight for having his back with a gift of cucumbers. Unfortunately, Dwight doesn’t seem to agree to have his back permanently, only as long as he’s right.

Inside the trailer where Gabriel and Negan are stuck, the former keeps trying to get a confession out of his enemy. Negan instructs him on a great many things, particularly his sense of morality. He says that they’re called the Saviors because he only kills those that need killing. He’s benevolent because he doesn’t allow people to be weak, like the unknown previous leader of the group. He also confesses that, prior to the apocalypse, he worked with kids. He isn’t specific but it gives fans a small glimpse into Negan’s character and who he used to be.

Gabriel presses, hoping to get Negan to say something meaningful. He starts to talk about his first wife, musing if she was real or like the others he keeps at the Sanctuary. Negan looks like he’s about to brain Gabriel for his inquisitive nature, when the priest manages to snag the handgun Negan took off him. Sadly, he misses his shot and locks himself behind an interior door.

They put a pin in that as things cut to Rick and Daryl. They’re still salvaging the wreck that they caused last week in order to get the big guns from the Saviors that almost all of the Kingdom lost their lives to secure. Seeing a bevy of explosives, Daryl suggests they double back, blow a hole in the walls of the Sanctuary and let the walkers flood in. He’s battle-hungry and wants to end this war by sundown, which apparently will never come.

Rick is intrigued, but remembers the lesson he learned from Morales earlier in the day.

“Some of the people in there aren’t fighters, doing this could change that,” he says.

Rick seems to be making the point that workers will assimilate into the world when the war is done, but if their lives are threatened, they’ll be forced to fight. Daryl disagrees, and makes his argument with a swift punch to Rick’s face. The two start to tussle and end up not noticing the wreckage catch fire. While they were trading hands instead of clearing the scene, it blew up. Their fight ends as they’re both forced to sit and watch everything that so many of their ranks died for go up in smoke.

At the trailer, Negan is talking to Gabriel through the door saying that people are a resource. Therefore, he doesn’t want to kill the only person that could help him make an adequate break for the safety of the Sanctuary. It seems genuine, as the episode had been showing the softer side of Negan. However, things start to feel really truthful when Negan opens up.

Gabriel confessed that he let his congregation die, prompting Negan to meet him halfway. It turns out that Negan, (surprise, surprise) wasn’t a great husband to his first wife. He cheated on her a lot, but she stayed with him until she died… post apocalypse. Negan confesses that his weakness was in not being able to end her after she turned. It’s hard to tell if he’s being honest, but it doesn’t matter. Gabriel emerges and, for some unfathomable reason, tries to give Negan his gun. He doesn’t accept.

Instead, they cover themselves in the guts of a walker for camouflage and open the door. Walkers flood in, but none notice them. As they slowly make their way through the crowd, it’s Negan who breaks rank in order to save Gabriel – people are a resource after all. However, as they fight, their situation becomes dire when zombies overrun them.

Inside, the worst has happened for the Saviors. While the generals still try to figure out a plan, the workers, and their vast numbers, realize that they’re deal to work while the soldiers protect them is feeling a bit one-sided. Simon tries to keep the peace, but it’s not his strong suit as he almost starts three fights. Still, his bravado starts to crack as one of the workers pulls a gun. Regina stops them, but things are about to pop off when they hear a distant whistle.

Negan strolls in with Gabriel, forcing everyone to kneel. He reminds them to keep in line because he’s the all-seeing, all-hearing bad boy that’s not going to die until he is good and ready. He tells everyone to fall back in line while he regroups, ready to figure out who the rat in their midst is. After all, none of the Saviors know who it is… except Eugene.

When they reveal someone has been feeding the rebels guns, he puts it together that Dwight is the rat, but he doesn’t reveal that information. Instead, Negan puts him to work on fixing their situation with the walkers outside.

The episode ends with Rick revealing the last part of his plan, to visit the trash people who betrayed them last season, while Father Gabriel appears to be succumbing to some kind of fever. In his addled state, he seems to reveal that Rick has a big plan for the Sanctuary that’s not been revealed yet. He has reason to believe they’re all in danger.

Heat overpowered in 2nd half in blowout loss to visiting Pacers

The Miami Heat were handed a 25-point loss Sunday night at home against the Pacers.

MIAMI (AP) — Bojan Bogdanovic scored 26 points, Myles Turner added 25 and the Indiana Pacers embarrassed the Miami Heat in the second half on the way to a 120-95 rout Sunday night.

Turner made 11 of 14 shots for the Pacers, who won their third straight game overall and got their first win in Miami since Nov. 12, 2014. Each of the last 11 regular-season games in the series were won by the home team, until the Pacers emphatically changed that in this one.

Victor Oladipo scored 15, Darren Collison had 12 points and 10 assists and Thaddeus Young added 12 for Indiana. The Pacers outscored Miami 69-40 in the game’s final 25 minutes and shot 60 percent for the game.

Wayne Ellington scored 21 points, all of them coming on 3-pointers, for the Heat. Josh Richardson and Hassan Whiteside each scored 15 and James Johnson added 10 for the Heat.

Dion Waiters was scoreless for Miami, missing all 10 of his shots. Miami’s starters were outscored by Indiana’s 90-44 — a huge disappointment on the heels of a road win in Washington two nights earlier.

“Look, I don’t have an answer to our unreliability right now,” Heat coach Erik Spoelstra said.

It was a three-point game at the half, and the building was starting to empty around the start of the fourth. Indiana outscored Miami 32-13 in the third, shooting 64 percent in the period, outrebounding the Heat 12-7 and getting 11 points off turnovers in those 12 minutes alone.

Miami led by six midway through the second quarter, but the Pacers scored the last seven points of the half — and that spurt became a full-fledged surge in the third quarter. Indiana would eventually lead by as many as 30 points.

TIP-INS

Pacers: Indiana improved to 18-37 all-time in regular-season games at Miami. Home teams always have a huge edge in this series; the Pacers are 44-9 in regular season games against the Heat in Indianapolis. … This was the start of the fifth back-to-back for Indiana this season, and the Pacers now have a chance for their second sweep. … The 30-point lead was Indiana’s largest of the season.

Heat: Udonis Haslem finally got into a game, getting called upon in the final minutes for the first appearance of the season — and officially making him a 15-year member of the Heat. … The shooting woes weren’t exclusive to Waiters. Goran Dragic and James Johnson were both 3 for 8. . … The Heat had 12 players score.

BEST AND WORST

The 25-point margin was Indiana’s largest win of the season (previous best being 23 at Minnesota on Oct. 24), and the biggest Miami loss of the season (previous worst being 17 twice, most recently at Golden State on Nov. 6).

SCHEDULING QUIRK

Both of Indiana’s trips to Miami this season are now out of the way. In a weird quirk, six of the last seven Pacers-Heat games have been played in Miami. The Heat go to Indianapolis on Jan. 10 and March 25.

UP NEXT

Pacers: Visit Orlando on Monday night, closing a two-day Florida swing.

Heat: Host Boston on Wednesday night, wrapping up a two-game homestand.

Chargers harass rookie QB Peterman, Bills en route to 54-24 win

Casey Hayward made two of the Chargers’ five interceptions and Los Angeles cruised to a 54-24 victory over the slumping Bills on Sunday.

CARSON, Calif. (AP) Casey Hayward made two of the Chargers’ five interceptions during a horrific first half by Buffalo rookie quarterback Nathan Peterman, and Los Angeles cruised to a 54-24 victory over the slumping Bills on Sunday.

Korey Toomer returned Peterman’s first interception 59 yards for a touchdown on Buffalo’s opening drive, the rookie threw two more interceptions in the first quarter and two additional picks in the second. Peterman was pulled from his first NFL start with a 37-7 halftime deficit after just 14 pass attempts for the Bills (5-5), who lost their third straight.

Buffalo benched Tyrod Taylor and promoted the fifth-round pick from Pitt earlier this week despite being in playoff position. Coach Sean McDermott replaced Peterman with Taylor in the second half, and the veteran went 15 of 25 for 158 yards, throwing one TD pass and rushing for another score.

The Chargers thoroughly capitalized on Peterman’s mistakes, putting up a 27-point second quarter and their highest-scoring performance in Philip Rivers’ 195 consecutive starts since 2006. Los Angeles set a franchise record for points in a first half during the Bills’ worst defensive half since 1977, and the Chargers posted a resounding win for coach Anthony Lynn, who finished last season as Bills interim coach.

Rivers passed for 250 yards and Keenan Allen had 12 receptions for 159 yards and two touchdowns for the Chargers (4-6), whose offense capitalized on the extraordinary bounty created by its defense.

#Chargers LIVE: Coach Lynn addresses the media after defeating the Bills, 54-24 https://t.co/mpiShSGYB7

— #BUFvsLAC (@Chargers) November 20, 2017

Joey Bosa particularly harassed Peterman, with his pressure contributing to Peterman’s second and third picks. Bosa also forced a fumble while sacking Taylor on fourth down in the third quarter, and Melvin Ingram returned it 39 yards for a touchdown.

Taylor hit LeSean McCoy with a 12-yard TD pass on fourth down in the fourth quarter. McCoy also rushed for 114 yards and an early score.

One week after a heartbreaking overtime loss in Jacksonville, the Chargers snapped a two-game skid and got back into fine form on both sides of the ball. Melvin Gordon and Austin Ekeler rushed for TDs, and Nick Novak kicked four field goals.

Peterman actually completed his first two passes, and his first interception wasn’t his fault. The pass hit fullback Pat DiMarco in the hands and went airborne, allowing Toomer to catch it for a rollicking return down the Buffalo sideline.

The Bills even tied it in the first quarter when McCoy made two runs totaling 64 yards, including a 27-yard scoring run for the Bills’ first touchdown in a first quarter this season.

But Peterman threw his third interception to Tre Boston while getting planted on his back by Bosa, and Allen then caught his first touchdown pass since the Chargers’ opener on a beautiful back-shoulder throw by Rivers.

Los Angeles took a 47-10 lead in the third quarter and got many of its regulars off the field in the second half to rest for its Thanksgiving game at Dallas.

#Chargers blow out Bills 54-24.

Game recap: https://t.co/RhMa7H5Gt5pic.twitter.com/rwJ21JJYrC

— #BUFvsLAC (@Chargers) November 20, 2017

INJURIES

Bills: Buffalo played without starting LT Cordy Glenn and WR Jordan Matthews, who sat out with a knee injury. … The Bills lost new WR Kelvin Benjamin to a right knee injury after a 20-yard catch on their opening drive. … S Micah Hyde injured his knee early in the second half.

Chargers: LT Russell Okung left the field gingerly in the second quarter, but missed only two snaps. … WR Travis Benjamin was sidelined by a strained abdominal muscle.

RIVERS RECOVERS

Rivers spent the week in the NFL’s concussion protocol after reporting symptoms on Monday , but he was cleared in time to keep alive his streak of consecutive starts since the 2006 opener. The veteran went 21 of 33 before Kellen Clemens played the fourth quarter.

BIG KICKS

Bills kicker Stephen Hauschka set an NFL record by making his 13th consecutive field goal of 50 yards or longer during the third quarter. He also tied the franchise record with his sixth 50-yard field goal of the season.

UP NEXT

Bills: At Kansas City Chiefs on Sunday.

Chargers: At Dallas Cowboys on Thursday.